GEOMAGNETIC STORM Predicted 3/17. Auroras as low as New York

ISS Northern Lights

Imagery taken by astronauts on station includes flights over nighttime U.S. and views of the aurora borealis over Canada and the Pacific.

Update – NOAA predicts 70 percent chance of GEOMAGNETIC STORM March 17th

A CME that left the sun on March 15th is expected to ompact Earth’s magnetic field on March 17th.

Earlier Warhing – On March 15th a Space Weather Watch was issued by NOAA. There have been several warnings throughout the past 24 hours and they are now predicting a geomagnetic storm which will cause the Auroras to become more prominent. They may be seen well into areas as low as the northern United States. This kind of storm can also effect power grids, and satellite operations. You can monitor current space weather on the KnowledgeOrb space weather page. Aurora viewing updates can be seen on the KnowledgeOrb Aurora viewing page.  If you would like to get an email any time there is a Space Weather event subscribe to the KnowledgeOrb Space Weather Email Service.

Text of  Alerts/Warnings listed below:

Issue Time: 2013 Mar 15 1712 UTC

WATCH: Geomagnetic Storm Category G2 Predicted

Highest Storm Level Predicted by Day:
Mar 16: G1 (Minor) Mar 17: G2 (Moderate) Mar 18: None (Below G1)

THIS SUPERSEDES ANY/ALL PRIOR WATCHES IN EFFECT

Potential Impacts: Area of impact primarily poleward of 55 degrees Geomagnetic Latitude.
Induced Currents – Power grid fluctuations can occur. High-latitude power systems may experience voltage alarms.
Spacecraft – Satellite orientation irregularities may occur; increased drag on low Earth-orbit satellites is possible.
Radio – HF (high frequency) radio propagation can fade at higher latitudes.
Aurora – Aurora may be seen as low as New York to Wisconsin to Washington state.
2013 Mar 15 1510 UTC
Solar-terrestrial indices for 14 March follow.
Solar flux 123 and estimated planetary A-index 5.
The estimated planetary K-index at 1500 UTC on 15 March was 1.

Space weather for the past 24 hours has been minor.
Radio blackouts reaching the R1 level occurred.

Space weather for the next 24 hours is predicted to be minor.
Geomagnetic storms reaching the G1 level are likely.

About the author

Recipient of many prestigious NASA Awards including the Exceptional Public Service Medal and the Robert H. Goddard award. Experience includes working for NASA, as a contractor, in satellite design, construction and operations. Expert in the satellite operations concepts and ground systems including command, control, and science data processing.